The Art And Science Of Debate

Debate Menu

This page includes links to a series of posts on the conduct of argument under the assumption that the other party is engaging in deceit, and justification of parasitism. In other words: immorality.  

1 – Debate Technique
2 – Class and Ideological Biases
3 – Fallacies and Cognitive Biases 

1 – Technique

1.1 – Guide For Conducting  Political Debate Under Moral Inequality  

The standard model of debate that is taught in university is antiquated – partly because of its scholastic origins, and partly because it has not kept pace with analytical rigor and our understanding of economics; but mostly because of the condition of our current cultural divide.

In this article I try to correct the existing timid approach to argument and provide a method for approaching political debate, by providing more than a dozen basic principles to follow.

1.2 – Guide to Conducting Sustained Arguments in Hostile Forums

The (unpleasant) process I use to research and attack opposing positions in hostile forums.

1.3 – A Glossary Of Terms For Use In Evaluating Political Debates

In “Degrees of Political Argument” I’ve tried add something valuable to the technology of political debate by developing a ranking system for different forms of debate, rather than to categorize arguments as a long list of errors.

I. DEGREES OF POLITICAL ARGUMENT
II. TYPES OF DISCOURSE
III. TYPES OF ANALOGICAL ARGUMENTS
IIII. ARGUMENTATIVE RESOLUTIONS
V. ETHICAL MODELS
VI. STYLES OF ARGUMENT
VII. LOGICAL METHODS
VIII. TYPES OF PROPOSITIONS

1.4 – Examples Of Using Propertarian Methodology

A few examples of extending the analytical method into the economic method.

1.5 – Answers to Common Problems in Political Debate (UNDONE)

Using extensions to Propertarian ethics I’ve tried to answer a number of common political problems, to both illustrate that they are resolvable, and that the Propertarian ethic has broad explanatory power.

2 – Class and Ideological Biases

2.1 – An Analysis of Political Ideologies (UNDONE)

Political ideologies are best understood as the means by which one class gains power over the others. In this article I try to put these political ideologies in their class contexts.

2.2 – Understanding Social Classes UNDONE)

Using an alternative to standard class analysis, I’ve tried to explain how classes and their elites function in society and how they affect our political process.

2.3 – Understanding Gender Biases (Undone)

Reproductives strategies are compatible but also competitive, and only reconcilable through compromise.

3 – Fallacies and Cognitive Biases


3.1 – Common Scientific Errors

Twenty Concepts for Public Intellectuals, Journalists, Advisors, Politicians and Bureaucrats.

3.2 – Common Economic Fallacies

The Big 3: 1) Statistical Misrepresentation, 2) Failure to Account for Hidden Costs or Hidden Transfers, 3) Correlation is not Causation.
Plus a number of other common Errors.

3.3 – Common Unintended Consequences (UNDONE)

Despite our good intentions we often create incentives that achieve the opposite of our desires.

3.4 – A List Of Cognitive Biases

The human mind still retains it’s pre-cognitive biases, and those biases affect all of our thinking. This list is useful in helping you identify errors in your thinking as well as in your opponent’s thinking.

3.5 – List Of Logical Fallacies

I’ve tried to approach logical fallacies from a more utilitarian point of view, by elaborating on some of the most common errors in political debate.

3.6 – Fallacies: Propaganda and Disinformation instead of Debate

We tend to focus on fallacies as accidental errors, but since politics is a forum for psychological exegesis, deception, theft and power accumulation, we can cast fallacies as intentional deceptions.

3.7 – Fallacies: Shaming Tactics

Women may have evolved gossip, but cosmopolitans turned it into a pseudoscience, and the postmoderns may have weaponized it.  This is a list of common ad hominem shaming tactics.